Forest X-Change Lab (2019)


Forest X-Change Lab (FXc ) is an off-grid network of scifi-pods that invite participants to contribute to telling the story of the Anthropocene. FXc is a collaboration between Detroit-based architect Aaron Jones’s experiential, narrative design practice, and NYC/Maine-based artists Leila Nadir and Cary Adams/Peppermint’s socially engaged, environmental art. Experimental, cylindrical, aerospace dwellings, located in the

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microbial selfies (2017)


Exhibited as part of OS Fermentation, MICROBIAL SELFIES are digital images created with custom electronics and software that allow microbes to take their own “selfies” and add image manipulation effects based on the shifting pH levels, oxygen, and color values of the fermentation process. Microbial Selfies is part of EcoArtTech’s new series of social sculptures,

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school of live culture (2016+)


  School of Live Culture (SLC) is an artwork of ruderal ecologies and radical pedagogy. In its first iteration, SLC hired at-risk youth in the Rust Belt city of Rochester, New York, to teach local students about sustainability and food justice. Working with Seedfolk City Farm, the Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence, and the University of

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food convenience labor luxury (2017)


Food Convenience Labor Luxury is both a travel memoir and performance document contrasting industrial food infrastructure with the artists’ personal experimentations with slower, more primitive practices. City quick-marts, fast-food restaurants, military infrastructure, transportation highways, potato factories, and BigAg intertwine with foraging, D.I.Y. grey-water systems, slow-cooking with microbes, making meals from scratch, clearing land for gardens,

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os fermentation (2015)


OS FERMENTATION is a slow-cooking class, a healing ritual, and a spiritual revival of interspecies collaborations and new networks of open-source micro-practices. It is part of EcoArtTech’s new series of social sculptures, titled EdibleEcologies, working collaboratively with local communities (human, bacterial, and ecological) to resuscitate historic food practices and facilitate recovery from a cultural memory

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nature being specter


Climate change “has not only become a piece of news, not only a story, not only a drama, but also the plot of a tragedy. And a tragedy that is so much more tragic than all the earlier plays, since it seems now very plausible that human actors may arrive too late on the stage

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indeterminate hikes+ (2012)


Through a series of walking tours, INDETERMINATE HIKES+ mobile media app transforms everyday landscapes into sites of psychogeographical diversity and wild happenings. IH+ re-appropriates smartphones, which are generally used for rapid communication and consumerism, and turns them into tools of alternative mappings, environmental imagination, and meditative wonder. The app works by importing the rhetoric of

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basecamp.exe (2013/14)


Too often, “the environment” is regarded as a wild, faraway destination, and we forget the ecological connections in our own homes and backyards, on city sidewalks and interstate highways. BASECAMP.EXE is a workshop-installation, a 21st-century ecological happening, and an interconnected ecosystem of new media and environmental artifacts. Created collaboratively with public participants, BASECAMP.EXE explores environmental

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wilderness collider (2012)


WILDERNESS COLLIDER is a poetic, generative internet art installation that collects digital data produced by people who use our Indeterminate Hikes+ app and mashes this info up into a moving-image collage. A live web app, WILDERNESS COLLIDER scrapes IH+ data instantaneously, as soon as an indeterminate hike occurs anywhere in the world, and produces a

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bob takes a nap (2012)


“What is suffering? I’m not sure what it is, but I know that suffering is the name we give to the origin of all the sighs, screams, and groans — small and large, crude and multifaceted — that concern us. The word defines our gaze even more than what we are looking at.” –Jonathan Safran

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